The Republic of T.

Black. Gay. Father. Vegetarian. Buddhist. Liberal.

David & Andrew

The one thing I didn't get from David Kuo's book is just where he stands on gay issues, like marriage, etc.. I suspect he's like a lot of progressive or "partially progressive" evangelicals who, at best, would just rather not talk about same-sex marriage, because they oppose it and/or it's a very low priority for them. (Jim Wallis doesn't get to it until near the end of God's Politics.) So, it will be interesting to see how his "blogalogue" with Andrew Sullivan progresses.

5 Comments

  1. I don’t know if it is quite fair to say to criticize someone for seeing war, hunger and poverty as a higher priority than same-sex marriage in the U.S. I would not want to be unable to get married to the person I loved because of my sexual orientation… but I must say it’s better than dying before I’m old enough to even be in love (of say AIDS, disease, starvation, or genocide). While we in America are blessed enough that people can devote entire careers to arguing over same-sex marriage legislation… people around the world spend all of their time worrying about eating… living. They don’t get to have careers or fall in love. How is it really so “partially progressive” to care about that more than you care about marriage laws in the world’s richest nation?

  2. The more I listen to this, the more it sounds like “Just shut up and be glad you have it as good as you do, because nothing’s going to happen for a very long time.”

  3. How is it really so “partially progressive” to care about that more than you care about marriage laws in the world’s richest nation?

    How progressive is it to acknowledge an injustice and effectively say, “we’re not going to do anything about it for a while,” and know that people will continue to suffer that injustice in the meantime?

  4. You say that I sound like this to you :“Just shut up and be glad you have it as good as you do, because nothing’s going to happen for a very long time.”

    To me, you sound like this: “Just shut up about the people dying in Iraq, shut up about the genocide in Africa, shut up about hunger and poverty… how can you talk about those things while same-sex marriage still isn’t legal?”

    I have never once said that I don’t agree with you about same-sex marriage. I just don’t understand why you have to criticize someone JUST because they don’t have it at the very top of their list. None of this has to do with what you advocate. All of this has to do with your criticism of a great man simply because he talks more about ending genocide and war more than he talks about same-sex marriage. It seems very close-minded and intolerant to me.

  5. It does seem very odd that Mr. Kuo would not mention one of key areas where the Bush administration and religion came together–meaning same-sex marriage. This may not have been a concern of Mr Kuo’s (truly because he doesn’t mention it in his book.) However, it was a major campaign/policy position of the administration to relate with evangelicals. The focus on same-sex marriage by the administration distracted them from the issues that *were* Mr. Kuo’s focus. Personally, this oversight smells of homophobia/heterosexism–he appears to be rewriting history to remove gay people.

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