The Republic of T.

Black. Gay. Father. Vegetarian. Buddhist. Liberal.

Noah’s Arc Torpedoed

There are a few television shows I’ve watched from the pilot to the final episode And in each case it’s because after I started watching I said to myself, “This is too good. I’d better watch every episode, because it will never last. Millennium was one. I’ll Fly Away was another. Neither made it past three seasons, though I’ll Fly Away managed to find a home on public television for a while. Now Noah’s Arc joins the list of “too good to last” television, with no third season and vague promises of a movie, next year.

Logo, a division of Viacom Inc.’s (NYSE: VIA and VIA.B) MTV Networks, today announced that it plans to bring Noah’s Arc, its hit flagship series about four AfricanAmerican gay friends in Los Angeles to the silver screen in 2008 as Logo’s first original theatrical film.

Noah’s Arc will join Sex and the City, Star Trek and The Simpsons as yet another fan-driven series finding a home at the multiplex, opening the door to greater storytelling depth, expanded creative opportunities and new audiences. Currently in development, the film is expected to pick up after the show’s second season cliffhanger finale and continue with an even bolder and provocative storyline. The film will leave the door open for sequels, additional television seasons and specials. The series is created by and executive produced by Patrik-Ian Polk and his Tall Skinny Black Boy Productions.

“Noah’s Arc has one of the most intensely loyal fan bases in television and we’re thrilled to harness the power of film to let Patrik-Ian Polk continue the story he has so skillfully woven,” said Brian Graden, President, Entertainment, MTV Networks Music Group, and President, Logo. “Noah’s Arc has so many dimensions and possibilities, so advancing to the feature film format is an exciting way to motivate our loyal fans and engage an even wider audience.”

Logo’s most popular series, season one of Noah’s Arc premiered in October 2005, just months after the launch of the network and season two premiered in August 2006. The show, which became the first television series about LGBT people of color, follows the lives and loves of four African-American gay men looking for love and signs of intelligent life in Los Angeles: Noah (Darryl Stephens), Chance (Doug Spearman), Alex (Rodney Chester) and Ricky (Christian Vincent)

Rod, whose in the media business, finds the move “curious.” Keith, who knows some of the folks at Logo finds it unusual. I don’t get much closer to the television industry than reaching for my remote, and — aside from serving as volunteer camera man for Jason Bellini at the White House Easter Egg Roll — I don’t know a soul at Logo. But I think I have an idea what’s up with this effective cancelation, and I’m not as optimistic or generous as Keith and Rod.

Call me cynical but, I think the “next level” spin is overly optimistic, if it’s intended to imply that the show is going to go anywhere after the 2008 movie. (If that movie every happens, and if it actually end up in theaters instead of going to straight to DVD.)

The movie is the third season, and after that the show is OVER. How many shows go from the television to the big screen and then return to television?

Logo is a television network, first and foremost, and has to make money. Look at their line-up. How many original series do you see, compared to “reality” shows? Original series — what with salaries for the actors, the cost of sets, etc. — are probably a lot more expensive to produce than reality shows. Noah’s Arc, as a dramatic series, may have been popular but my guess is that it was more expensive to produce than the network’s other shows. And it appealed to a smaller demographic than even the network’s target audience.

The hubby and I noticed, during the second season, that the commercial breaks during Noah’s Arc seemed longer than in other Logo shows, and longer than during the first season. They probably crammed in more commercials in order to pay for the show during season two, and figured that if they tried to do more of that during season three, the commercials would take up more time than the actual show.

My guess is that somewhere between now and next year, the theatrical movie release will become a Logo original “television movie,” with the third season crammed into 90 minutes. The release buys them some time for the show’s fans to calm down. By the time they announce that the movie isn’t happening, will only be aired on Logo (“an original Logo exclusive!”), or will be go straight to DVD, passions will have died down a bit, and it’ll be easier to quietly drop the show.

Either way, once the credits roll and the screen fades to black, “Noah’s Arc” is over and it ain’t coming back.

2 Comments

  1. And it’s very sad. Any idea how/if the DVD sales of Season 1 were noteworthy? Noah’s Arc Creator Patrik-Ian Polk on his myspace page calls for fans to buy up all the Season 2 dvds to send a message to LOGO management about the popular fan base. “That’s how Family Guy came back to network television,” he writes.

  2. HOW CAN PEOPLE JUST CANCEL WUT SEEMS 2 ME A VERY POPULAR SHOW? I HAVE BOTH SEASONS OF THE SOW & IT MAKES ME MAD TO FIND OUT THAT THE LAST SCENE I SAW ON SEASON 2 WAS PROBABLY THE LAST. I LOVE THAT SHOW, U CAN’T JUST LEAVE IT LIKE THAT. IF IT’S CANCELLED OR WHAT NOT, ATLEAST END IT CORRECTLY IN A MOVIE OR 1 LAST SEASON. PLEASE.

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