The Republic of T.

Black. Gay. Father. Vegetarian. Buddhist. Liberal.

Cheaters Win?

I have a confession to make. I hadn’t made up my mind to come clean until I read this mornings Washington Post Express and saw an article about a transgression much like my own. Exactly like it, in fact. I’ve been cheating on my husband. Regularly, even. Sometimes as often as twice a week. Just like Kurt Rieschick.

Kurt Rieschick can’t stop cheating on his boyfriend. He knows it’s wrong, but sometimes David Klimas works odd hours. And Rieschick gets lonely. And those naughty red envelopes are so enticing.

So, occasionally, Rieschick sneaks into the media room, with its flat screen TV and surround sound, and proceeds to break a relationship commandment of the 21st century. Thou Shalt Not Netflix Without Me.

Actually, you can add Tivo to that, especially since I can schedule my flicks online and watch them when the hubby goes to bed.

Look, it’s not entirely my fault. We just like different things in movies. I love dark, independent flicks, and documentaries absolutely enthrall me. He prefers romantic comedies above all else. I get a thrill out of scary movies. He gets nightmares. I like watching them late at night. He goes to bed way early (like, before midnight). I loved Memento and he hated it. He loved The Ritz and I thought it was just weird.

So, when we Netflix together the movie must be carefully chosen, and the time scheduled. But that’s not actually what drew my eye to that article. Can you guess what it was?

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Lemme give you the first sentence again.

Kurt Rieschick can’t stop cheating on his boyfriend.

It wasn’t until I read further that I realized what a sign of progress the article actually is. I mean, isn’t it progress when a gay couple is featured in an article, or some other media story, where their relationship is stated matter-of-factly and isn’t even the point of the story in the first place? Maybe I’m overly optimistic (because I’m sure the Express will get at least one letter about this story) but I always feel a little hopeful when I see something like this, just like I do when the hubby and I are watching Trading Spaces or some decorating show on HGTV and it turns out that a same-sex couple is featured for some reason other than being a same-sex couple.

It’s something I’ve blogged about before, summed up in a passage from Families Like Mine: Children of Gay Parents Tell It Like It Is (which I recommend any LGBT parent read, especially if your kids are still young because you’ll get some great pointers for the future).

Being profiled in the paper simply because I was from one of those famiiles is progress, but not success. Success will be when a child with LGBT parents can be profiled for some other reason, and the mention of his or her family can be referenced without sexual orientation becoming the main focus.

The last time I thought about that was when I read a Washington Post article about a vegetarian teenager who happened to have two moms, and that was part of the story instead of the focus of the story.

I know Kurt and David don’t have kids, but I’m inclined to score their Express mention as a “win” for same-sex couples and our families. Cheating aside.

One Comment

  1. isn’t it progress when a gay couple is featured in an article, or some other media story, where their relationship is stated matter-of-factly and isn’t even the point of the story in the first place?

    Have you seen Love and Other Catastrophes? Though it surely wasn’t the first ever to do so, it was the first film I ever saw in which the gay relationships were just relationships, no big deal. (It’s a romantic comedy — I’m sure your husband would like it!)

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